Instructions and Information for Watches & Clocks

10 Uses for the Chronograph

10 Uses for the Chronograph

  1. The Stop Watch. Press the button at the start and again at the stop of any event.
  2. Second Time Zone. Use the hour sub-dial like a second watch – start precisely when you know the hour differences between the two time zones.
  3. Appointment Reminder. Advance the chrono hand to an hour or minute you would like to note. With the hand off its normal 12 o’clock position, you’ll again see your appointment time.
  4. Quick Glance. Move the chronograph hand to cover the minute hand. After a workout, for example, look at the new position of the minute hand for quick note of elapsed time.

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Divers Watches (Compatibility Mode)

Divers Watches (Compatibility Mode)

A dive watch needs to be maintained properly so that it can help keep you safe in the water. By taking a few extra minutes before and after your dive you can add years to the life of your watch. Another great reason to take care of your dive watch, beside safety, is that some of these watches can cost thousands of dollars.

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Cuckoo Clock Instructions

Cuckoo Clock Instructions

Before hanging up the clock please carefully read these operating instructions. It is very important to follow these procedures.

Unpack with care. When removing the clock from the box, please hold it at the roof only be cautious of the carvings, as these are fragile. Be sure to take out the loose accessories, such as pendulum, weights, etc. DO NOT remove the wire or elastic fixed to the bottom, and do not unwrap the chains yet.

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Most Common Errors When Installing a Cuckoo Clock

Most Common Errors When Installing a Cuckoo Clock

1. Always hang the clock on a sturdy nail or screw in a stud (preferably) at an angle. This should avoid the “falling off the wall” problem. Do not use a picture hook.

2. Hang the clock so the back of the clock is flush against the wall.

3. Don’t level with your eyes. Use a level, and listen for an even tick tock sound. This will prevent the clock from stopping…

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Hanging a Wall Clock

Hanging a Wall Clock

1. Hang the clock where there is a wall stud, so that a heavy duty nail or wood screw can be used

2. For drywall or masonite, use a molly bolt. The 1/8 inch diameter is standard and is rated to around 50 pounds, sufficient for most clocks. A molly bolt is an expansion bolt. Drill a hole in the wall, insert the molly bolt and screw it up until the expanders draw it tight against the wall. The screw can then be backed in and out to hang the clock. These bolts come in different lengths it is recommended to use a depth of a 1/2 inch for most walls…

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Adjusting Your Chelsea Barometer to Local Altitude

Adjusting Your Chelsea Barometer to Local Altitude

When it left the factory, your Chelsea barometer was adjusted to register pressure at sea level, which is the standard for measurement of barometric pressure regardless of location or altitude. Since atmospheric pressure decreases as altitude increases, if you are located in a higher altitude your barometer will indicate a lower pressure.

It will be necessary for you to adjust it to give you a reading corrected to sea level. To do this either call the local weather bureau or check online for the present barometer reading. Next adjust your barometer’s black indicator hand to the reading given.

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Instructions for Chelsea Shipstrike Clocks

Instructions for Chelsea Shipstrike Clocks

MECHANICAL:

To Start Your clock leaves the Chelsea factory fully wound. Remove the black tube from the winding arbor (Save and replace tube when you are shipping the clock or are away for long periods of time.) Although full cycle is 8 days, it is recommended that you rewind your clock weekly….

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Instructions for Chelsea Time and Tide Clocks

Instructions for Chelsea Time and Tide Clocks

QUARTZ:

Chelsea presents a unique instrument combining both regular and tide time on a single dial.

1. Reading the Clock A specially designed dial provides easy reading of the clock. The outer band is Standard Time. The inner portion is color coded indicating phases of the tide.

Two red triangles at 3 and 9 o’clock positions represent midtides. Hours past and hours to high tide can be read directly from this dial. The big red hand near the dial face is the tide dial and revolves approximately once ever 12 hours and 25 minutes. Strong winds and coastal conditions affect tide cycles, therefore periodic resetting of the tide hand may be necessary…

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Instructions for Chelsea Ships Bell Clocks

Instructions for Chelsea Ship’s Bell Clocks

WINDING:

1. Wind fully once each week at approximately the same time. The right hand winding arbor (located at 4 o’clock) is for the time-side mainspring while the left hand arbor is for the strike side mainspring. Be sure to wind both, starting with the strike side. IF THE CLOCK HAS RUN DOWN, it must be wound first before setting the hands. If the minute hand is locked, this is an indication that the levers are jammed. To release the levers, simply wind the clock fully on both sides then move the minute hand backwards at least 1 hour. Then reset the time allowing it to strike fully at the hour and half hour…

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Manual Wind Mechanical Watches

Manual Wind Mechanical Watches

The mechanical watch is a considered a mature technology, and virtually all mechanical watch movements have the same parts and work the same way. Mechanical watches have been in use since the 1600’s with updates and newer technology thus creating the mechanical watches of today…

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Set Lever Pocket Watches

Set Lever Pocket Watches

ATTENION: Do Not Pull the Crown Out

To set the hands on certain older pocket watches and all RR approved models, a lever must be shifted first. It is located at 2 o’clock on open-faced models and at 4:30 on hunter case pocket watches. It is grabbed with the thumbnail and pulled out slightly. The crown will then set the hands. Push lever back in all the way when finished stetting and you will be able to wind the watch…

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Setting Instructions

Setting Instructions

Normal Crown: To se the time, pull the crown out fully (2 clicks) only if there is a quick set date position. Turn in either direction to set. Be sure to watch the calendar jump so you know when the date jumps that this is considered midnight. Push the crown in 1 click and turn it until the correct date is shown. If there is a day as well, turn the crown the opposite direction to set the day. After setting the time and date, be certain to push the crown in fully.

Screw-Down Crown: Setting the time and date with a screw down crown watch is the same as above; however, to pull out the crown you must first “unscrew” the crown by turning it in a counter clockwise direction until the crown releases from the treaded tube. After adjusting the time and/or date, push the crown in while screwing it down in a clockwise direction until the crown is sealed in a tight position. This is important to keep it water resistant.

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Tachy What

Tachy – What???!!!!
Unscrambling the Tachymeter Mystery

Most watches that feature a chronograph movement (automatic or quartz) also have a tachymeter (or Tachymetre). Ask someone who wears a watch with a tachymeter how the function works and you’ll often see a blank stare in their response. Tissot and Swiss Time want to crush the mystery once and for all behind this function which can be helpful when it comes to precision timing…

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How to diagnose if your T-Touch is no longer Synchronized

How to diagnose if your T-Touch is no longer Synchronized

If the time as indicated by the hands of your watch no longer match the digital time as indicated by the LCD your watch is no longer synchronized. A second tell-tale sign is if the hands no longer line up correctly with the according functions when you select them. The one exception to this is the Meteo function*. A third common indicator that your watch is no longer synchronized; is if the alignment of the compass is off.

All of the above will occur if the watch is not synchronized. Which sign you notice first will differ depending on the functions that they use most often…

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Understanding Water Resistance

Understanding Water Resistance

There are several features that help make a new watch water resistant. The most important are the gaskets, or O rings which are made of rubber, nylon, or Teflon. These gaskets are used to form watertight seals at the joints where the crown, case back and crystal meet the case. The thickness and material of the case is also a big factor in determining whether a watch can safely be worn underwater. A screw-in case back and screw-down crown as opposed to ones that push in create a better seal…

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Diver's Watch

Diver’s Watch

A dive watch needs to be maintained properly so that it can help keep you safe in the water. By taking a few extra minutes before and after your dive you can add years to the life of your watch. Another great reason to take care of your dive watch, beside safety, is that some of these watches can cost thousands of dollars…

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Answers to Your Questions About Watch Repair

Answers to Your Questions About Watch Repair

Why Does a Mechanical Watch Require Service?” A typical mechanical watch contains more than 100 parts. Twenty of these parts are in constant motion. Oil is used in a watch, just as it is used in your car’s engine, to keep the parts moving smoothly and to prevent undue wear. The amount of oil used to lubricate a watch is so minute that it will fit on the head of a pin. This oil, in time will evaporate, and leave a coagulated residue, which can lead to the jamming of the gears. Loss of oil also causes increased friction, and wear of metal parts, resulting in a progressive decline in performance and accuracy. Cleaning and oiling a watch involves the removal of the movement from the case, the complete elimination of all old oil, inspection and replacement of worn parts, and the re-oiling of at least fifteen separate locations. Once completed, the watch must be retimed, often requiring realignment of wheels and adjustment to the balance staff…

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